9 Ways To Start a Fire Without Matches

Tom Hanks Starting a Fire Without Matches

There is a primal link between man and fire. Every man should know how to start one. A manly man knows how to start one without matches. It’s an essential survival skill. You never know when you’ll find yourself in a situation where you’ll need a fire, but you don’t have matches. Maybe your single engine plane goes down while you’re flying over the Alaskan wilderness, like the kid in Hatchet. Or perhaps you’re out camping and you lose your backpack in a tussle with a bear. It need not be something as dramatic as these situations — even extremely windy or wet conditions can render matches virtually uselessly. And whether or not you ever need to call upon these skills, it’s just damn cool to know you can start a fire, whenever and wherever you are.

Friction-Based Fire Making

Friction-based fire making is not for the faint of heart. It’s probably the most difficult of all the non-match methods. There are different techniques you can use to make a fire with friction, but the most important aspect is the type of wood you use for the fire board and spindle.

The spindle is the stick you’ll use to spin in order to create the friction between it and the fireboard. If you create enough friction between the spindle and the fireboard, you can create an ember that can be used to create a fire. Cottonwood, juniper, aspen, willow, cedar, cypress, and walnut make the best fire board and spindle sets.

Before you can use wood to start a friction based fire, the wood must be bone dry. If the wood isn’t dry, you’ll have to dry it out first.

1. The Hand Drill

The hand drill method is the most primitive, the most primal, and the most difficult to do All you need is wood, tireless hands, and some gritty determination. Therefore, it’ll put more hair on your chest than any other method. Here’s how it’s done:

Build a tinder nest. Your tinder nest will be used to create the flame you get from the spark you’re about to create. Make a tinder nest out of anything that catches fire easily, like dry grass, leaves, and bark.

Make your notch. Cut a v-shaped notch into your fire board and make a small depression adjacent to it.

Place bark underneath the notch. The bark will be used to catch an ember from the friction between the spindle and fireboard.

Start spinning. Place the spindle into the depression on your fire board. Your spindle should be about 2 feet long for this to work properly. Maintain pressure on the board and start rolling the spindle between your hands, running them quickly down the spindle. Keep doing this until an ember is formed on the fireboard.

Start a fire! Once you see a glowing ember, tap the fire board to drop you ember onto the piece of bark. Transfer the bark to your nest of tinder. Gently blow on it to start your flame.

2. Fire Plough

Prepare your fireboard. Cut a groove in the fireboard. This will be your track for the spindle.

Rub! Take the tip of your spindle and place it in the groove of your fireboard. Start rubbing the tip of the spindle up and down the groove.

Start a fire. Have your tinder nest at the end of the fireboard, so that you’ll plow embers into as you’re rubbing. Once you catch one, blow the nest gently and get that fire going.

3. Bow Drill

Starting a fire with a bow drill

The bow drill is probably the most effective friction based method to use because it’s easier to maintain the speed and pressure you need to create enough friction to start a fire. In addition to the spindle and fireboard, you’ll also need a socket and a bow.

Get a socket. The socket is used to put pressure on the other end of the spindle as you’re rotating it with the bow. The socket can be a stone or another piece of wood. If you use another piece of wood, try to find a harder piece than what you’re using for the spindle. Wood with sap and oil are good as it creates a lubricant between the spindle and the socket.

Make your bow. The bow should be about as long as your arm. Use a flexible piece of wood that has a slight curve. The string of the bow can be anything. A shoelace, rope, or strip of rawhide works great. Just find something that won’t break. String up your bow and you’re ready to go.

Prepare the fireboard. Cut a v-shaped notch and create a depression adjacent to it in the fireboard. Underneath the notch, place your tinder.

String up the spindle. Catch the spindle in a loop of the bow string. Place one end of the spindle in the fireboard and apply pressure on the other end with your socket.

Start sawing. Using your bow, start sawing back and forth. You’ve basically created a rudimentary mechanical drill. The spindle should be rotating quickly. Keep sawing until you create an ember.

Make you fire. Drop the ember into the tinder nest and blow on it gently. You got yourself a fire.

4. Flint and Steel

Flint and Steel

This is an old standby. It’s always a good idea to carry around a good flint and steel set with you on a camping trip. Matches can get wet and be become pretty much useless, but you can still get a spark from putting steel to a good piece of flint. Swedish FireSteel Army modelis a good set to use.

If you’re caught without a flint and steel set, you can always improvise by using quartziteand the steel blade of your pocket knife (you are carrying your pocket knife, aren’t you?). You’ll also need char. Char is cloth that has been turned into charcoal. Char catches a spark and keeps it smoldering without bursting into flames. If you don’t have char, a piece of fungus or birch will do.

Grip the rock and char cloth. Take hold of the piece of rock between your thumb and forefinger. Make sure an edge is hanging out about 2 or 3 inches. Grasp the char between your thumb and the flint.

Strike! Grasp the back of the steel striker or use the back of your knife blade. Strike the steel against the flint several times. Sparks from the steel will fly off and land on the char cloth, causing a glow.

Start a fire. Fold up your char cloth into the tinder nest and gently blow on it to start a flame.

Lens-Based Methods

Fire from a mangnifying glass

Using a lens to start a fire is an easy matchless method. Any boy who has melted green plastic army men with a magnifying glass will know how to do this. If you have by chance never melted green plastic army men, here’s how to do it.

5. Traditional Lenses

To create a fire, all you need is some sort of lens in order to focus sunlight on a specific spot. A magnifying glass, eyeglasses, or binocular lenses all work. If you add some water to the lens, you can intensify the beam. Angle the lens towards the sun in order to focus the beam into as small an area as possible. Put your tinder nest under this spot and you’ll soon have yourself a fire.

The only drawback to the lens based method is that it only works when you have sun. So if it’s nighttime or overcast, you won’t have any luck.

In addition to the typical lens method, there are three odd, but effective, lens-based methods to start a fire as well.

6. Balloons and Condoms

By filling a balloon or condom with water, you can transform these ordinary objects into fire creating lenses.

Fill the condom or balloon with water and tie off the end. You’ll want to make it as spherical as possible. Don’t make the inflated balloon or condom too big or it will distort the sunlight’s focal point. Squeeze the balloon to find a shape that gives you a sharp circle of light. Try squeezing the condom in the middle to form two smaller lenses.

Condoms and balloons both have a shorter focal length than an ordinary lens. Hold them 1 to 2 inches from your tinder.

7. Fire From Ice

Fire from ice isn’t just some dumb cliché used for high school prom themes. You can actually make fire from a piece of ice. All you need to do is form the ice into a lens shape and then use it as you would when starting a fire with any other lens. This method can be particularly handy for wintertime camping.

Get clear water. For this to work, the ice must be clear. If it’s cloudy or has other impurities, it’s not going to work. The best way to get a clear ice block is to fill up a bowl, cup, or a container made out of foil with clear lake or pond water or melted snow. Let it freeze until it forms ice. Your block should be about 2 inches thick for this to work.

Form your lens. Use your knife to shape the ice into a lens. Remember a lens shape is thicker in the middle and narrower near the edges.

Polish your lens. After you get the rough shape of a lens, finish the shaping of it by polishing it with your hands. The heat from your hands will melt the ice enough so you get a nice smooth surface.

Start a fire. Angle your ice lens towards the sun just as you would any other lens. Focus the light on your tinder nest and watch as you make a once stupid cliché come to life.

8. Coke Can and Chocolate Bar

I saw this method in a YouTube video a while back ago and thought it was pretty damn cool. All you need is a soda can, a bar of chocolate, and a sunny day.

Polish the bottom of the soda can with the chocolate. Open up your bar of chocolate and start rubbing it on the bottom of the soda can. The chocolate acts as a polish and will make the bottom of the can shine like a mirror. If you don’t have chocolate with you, toothpaste also works.

Make your fire. After polishing the bottom of your can, what you have is essentially a parabolic mirror. Sunlight will reflect off the bottom of the can, forming a single focal point. It’s kind of like how a mirror telescope works.

Point the bottom of the can towards the sun. You’ll have created a highly focused ray of light aimed directly at your tinder. Place the tinder about an inch from the reflecting light’s focal point. In a few seconds you should have a flame.

While I can’t think of any time that I would be in the middle of nowhere with a can of Coke and chocolate bar, this method is still pretty cool.

9. Batteries and Steel Wool

Fire from steel wool and a battery

Like the chocolate and soda can method, it’s hard to imagine a situation where you won’t have matches, but you will have some batteries and some steel wool. But hey, you never know. And it’s quite easy and fun to try at home.

Stretch out the Steel Wool. You want it to be about 6 inches long and a ½-inch wide.

Rub the battery on the steel wool. Hold the steel wool in one hand and the battery in the other. Any battery will do, but 9-volt batteries work best. Rub the side of the battery with the “contacts” on the wool. The wool will begin to glow and burn. Gently blow on it.

Transfer the burning wool to your tinder nest. The wool’s flame will extinguish quickly, so don’t waste any time.

This Is Actually The Best Way To Make A Turkey For Christmas

SPOILER: It does NOT involve fitting a 5-gallon bucket in your fridge.

When it comes to Christmas dinner, turkey is a non-negotiable. The thing is, turkey can be a little, well…dry.

This Is Actually The Best Way To Make A Turkey For Thanksgiving
Warner Bros. / / Via giphy.com

Many people brine their turkeys by soaking it in salt water for 12 hours because so many recipes say that makes the meat more moist and tender.

Many people brine their turkeys by soaking it in salt water for 12 hours because so many recipes say that makes the meat more moist and tender.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

It’s called wet brining, and the thing is, wet brining is a pain in the ass.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

After you find a 5-gallon container, get your turkey into it, and fill the whole thing up with liquid, you need to make room in your fridge for it. ANNOYING.

GOOD NEWS, though! BuzzFeed Food conducted a blind taste test and found out that the best way to make your turkey is actually way easier: DRY BRINING.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Read all about that here.

Dry brining is nbd: You rub the turkey with salt, sugar, and any spices you want, then let it sit uncovered in the fridge overnight.

Overnight meaning at least 8 and up to 16 hours. See the full directions below.

Here are the ingredients you need to make a dry-brined roasted turkey:

Here are the ingredients you need to make a dry-brined roasted turkey:

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

1 14 to 16-pound turkey, thawed
⅓ cup kosher salt
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
¼ cup unsalted butter (for roasting)

First, take the turkey out of its packaging (do this over the sink) and remove the neck and giblets.

First, take the turkey out of its packaging (do this over the sink) and remove the neck and giblets.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

You can keep these for stock or gravy, but you don’t need them for the roast turkey.

Rinse the turkey under cold water, then use paper towels to dry it thoroughly, inside the cavity and out.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

In a small mixing bowl, stir together the salt, brown sugar, and ground black pepper.

In a small mixing bowl, stir together the salt, brown sugar, and ground black pepper.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Put the turkey on a large, rimmed baking sheet or in a large, shallow container, and rub the salt mixture (aka the dry brine) all over the turkey.

Put the turkey on a large, rimmed baking sheet or in a large, shallow container, and rub the salt mixture (aka the dry brine) all over the turkey.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Make sure you also rub it under the skin of the breasts, and inside the cavity.

Make sure you also rub it under the skin of the breasts, and inside the cavity.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Gently pull the skin away from the breast meat with your fingers — it might feel like it will tear, but if you pull carefully but firmly it won’t. Then rub the dry brine underneath the skin. TBH this is very fun.

Put the turkey on the baking sheet in the fridge and let it sit, UNCOVERED, for 8 to 16 hours.

Put the turkey on the baking sheet in the fridge and let it sit, UNCOVERED, for 8 to 16 hours.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

You’re probably going to have to shuffle some things around in there to make room, but it’s worth it.

When you’re ready to roast, rinse the turkey under cold water to get all the brine off, then dry it again with paper towels, outside and inside the cavity.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Put the rinsed, dried turkey in a roasting pan, on the rack.

Put the rinsed, dried turkey in a roasting pan, on the rack.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Let it sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes so that it’s not refrigerator-cold when it goes into the oven.

Rub ¼ cup softened butter under the skin of the turkey, on the breast meat.

Rub ¼ cup softened butter under the skin of the turkey, on the breast meat.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

This isn’t totally necessary, but it does help keep the white meat a little more tender and juicy.

Truss the turkey if you want: This is optional, but it makes the roasted turkey look prettier in the end and helps the skin on the thighs get crispy.

Truss the turkey if you want: This is optional, but it makes the roasted turkey look prettier in the end and helps the skin on the thighs get crispy.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

You’ll need a piece of twine that’s at least 36 inches long.
1. Tie the legs together with the butcher’s twine.
2. Then wrap the ends of the twine around the turkey and tie them tightly at the top.
3. Tuck the wings underneath the twine.

Pour a cup of water or stock into the roasting pan, then roast the turkey at 500°F for 30 minutes.

Pour a cup of water or stock into the roasting pan, then roast the turkey at 500°F for 30 minutes.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

The liquid in the pan will keep the drippings from burning, and starting at such a high temperature will help crisp the skin.

Turn the heat down to 350°F, and roast until a thermometer inserted into the fattest part of thigh, right where it meets the breast, reads 155°F. That’s about 1 ½ to 2 more hours for a 12- to 14-pound bird.

Turn the heat down to 350°F, and roast until a thermometer inserted into the fattest part of thigh, right where it meets the breast, reads 155°F. That's about 1 ½ to 2 more hours for a 12- to 14-pound bird.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

The USDA recommends you cook your turkey to an internal temperature of 165°F, to eliminate ANY AND ALL RISK of undercooking. We really, truly think that this overcooks the turkey and makes it dry and tough, brined or not. A turkey cooked to 155°F will reach at least 165°F after you take it out of the oven. (That’s called “carry-over cooking.”) And it’ll taste a lot better.

Let the turkey rest in the roasting rack for at least 20 minutes.

Let the turkey rest in the roasting rack for at least 20 minutes.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Don’t tent it with foil because it’ll be all steamy up in there and the skin will lose its crispiness.

Then carve (here’s how) and serve!

Then carve (here's how) and serve!

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed

Simple Dry-Brined Roast Turkey

Serves 8 to 10

INGREDIENTS
1 (14 to 16-pound) turkey, thawed, giblets and neck removed
⅓ cup kosher salt
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
¼ cup unsalted butter

PREPARATION
Rinse the turkey under cold water, then dry it thoroughly with paper towels, inside and out. Stir together the salt, sugar, and pepper in a small bowl, then rub the mixture all over the outside of the turkey and inside the cavity. Carefully pull the skin away from the breasts, just enough so that you can rub the brine underneath. Put the turkey on a large, rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate, uncovered, for 8 to 12 hours (overnight).

Preheat oven to 500°F and position a rack on the bottom shelf. Make sure there’s enough room for your turkey; take all the other racks out if you have to. Let your butter come to room temperature on the counter while you prepare the turkey.

Rinse the turkey it under cold water to wash away the brine, then dry it thoroughly with paper towels, inside and out. Place the turkey breast side up in a large turkey roasting pan with a rack and let it sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour.

Rub softened butter all over the breast meat of the turkey, carefully pulling the skin away from the breasts to rub butter underneath. Tie the legs together with a long piece of butcher’s twine, then wrap the ends around both sides of the turkey and tie them tightly at the top, right where the turkey’s neck used to be. Tuck the wings underneath the twine.

Add a cup of water to the pan and roast the turkey for 30 minutes at 500°F. (Starting the turkey at a super high temperature makes for crispier skin.) After 30 minutes, turn the oven down to 350°F and continue to roast the turkey for 1½ to 2 hours more, turning the roasting pan after an hour, until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh reads 155°F. When the turkey is done, let it rest for at least 20 minutes, then transfer to a cutting board, carve, and serve.

33 Clever DIY Christmas Tree Ideas

Even long after you stop believing in Santa Claus, a gorgeous Christmas tree remains the centerpiece of the holidays. Some families have a tradition of making their own Christmas decorations, and increasingly more people now choose to have a DIY Christmas tree as well.

Besides saving the trees, a DIY Xmas tree project also strengthens the holiday spirit, and makes them all the more special. It also serves as a one of a kind interior decoration. Check out our list of some clever DIY Christmas tree ideas and get creative!

1. Hardcover Christmas Tree

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2. Floating Ornament Christmas Tree

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3. Hand Print Christmas Tree

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4. Dry Wood Christmas Tree

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5. Egg Carton Christmas Tree

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6. Wrapping Paper Christmas Tree

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7. Shelf-made Christmas Tree

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8. Cardholder Christmas Tree

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9. Balloon Christmas Tree

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10. Button Christmas Tree

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11. Box Christmas Tree

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12. Strawberry Chocolate Christmas Tree

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13. Pompon Christmas Tree

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14. String Christmas Tree

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15. Tripod Christmas Tree

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16. Tissue Paper Christmas Tree

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17. Felt Ball Christmas Tree

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18. Felt Garland Christmas Tree

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19. Wine Cork Christmas Tree

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20. Driftwood Christmas Tree

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21. Ladder Christmas Tree

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22. Book Sculpture Christmas Tree

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23. Gift Ribbon Christmas Tree

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24. Leftover Panel Christmas Tree

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25. Wall Collection Christmas Tree

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26. Light Christmas Tree

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27. Block Puzzle Christmas Tree

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28. Newspaper Christmas Tree

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29. Forest Wood Christmas Tree

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30. Broccoli Salad Christmas Tree

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31. 2-D Gift Bag Christmas Tree

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32. Skinny Christmas Tree

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33. Cushion Christmas Tree

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Also See These 25 DIY Christmas Ornaments

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TRENDING — 20 Creative DIY Christmas Ornament Ideas

No other holidays have such a magical and joyous preparation period as Christmas, as the whole month of Advent is dedicated to get into the Christmas spirit and be merry. Truth be told, holidays will only be as festive as you make them – so don’t wait for the Christmas spirit to manifest itself, start creating it!

Probably the best way to get inspired for the holidays is to decorate your house and a Christmas tree. And if you take it one step further and decide to make the decorations and ornaments yourself, then Christmas will be all the more special!

1. Light Bulb Penguin Ornaments

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2. Steampunk Gear Christmas Ornament

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3. Tea Cup Ornament

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4. Old CD Ornament

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5. Mini Mittens

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6. Wine Cork Ornaments

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7. Book Page Rosette Christmas Ornament

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8. Thumbprint Ornaments

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9. Toilet Roll Reindeer

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10. Cinnamon Applesauce Heart Ornaments

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11. Pistachio Christmas Ornament

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12. Macaroni Snowflakes

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13. Lego Ornament

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14. Yarn Ball Ornament

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15. Computer’s Memory Recycled for Christmas

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16. Filled Ornament

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17. A Very Puzzling Rudolph

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18. Crochet Snowflakes

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19. Bottle Cap Snowman Ornaments

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20. Bell Jar Ornaments

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22 Creative DIY Christmas Tree Ideas

YUM! Easy Fall Dinners That’ll Make You Smile

1. Sweet Potato and Kale Grilled Cheese

Sweet Potato and Kale Grilled Cheese

No one will complain about Meatless Monday if there’s grilled cheese involved. Recipe here.

2. Slow Cooker Roasted Chicken

Slow Cooker Roasted Chicken

To be clear, the most perfect roast chicken is the kind you cook in a hot, hot oven with nothing but a little salt and pepper. But if you don’t want to wait over an hour for dinner, put this in the slow cooker and come home to (still very, very good) finished roast chicken. Recipe here.

3. Gnocchi with Brussels Sprouts, Chicken Sausage, and Kale Pesto

Gnocchi with Brussels Sprouts, Chicken Sausage, and Kale Pesto

Warm and satisfying is really the name of the game. Recipe here.

4. Cheesy Chicken Pizza Pockets

Cheesy Chicken Pizza Pockets

Fair warning: These will ruin hot pockets for you forever. Recipe here.

5. 5-Ingredient Cheesy Cauliflower Soup

5-Ingredient Cheesy Cauliflower Soup

If you want to save even more time, make a double batch of pesto when you cook the gnocchi, then use the rest of it here. Recipe here.

6. Golden Red Lentil Dal with Cilantro-Speckled Basmati (by Oh She Glows)

Golden Red Lentil Dal with Cilantro-Speckled Basmati (by Oh She Glows)

Lentils get a bad rap, but done right they’re super cozy and satisfying. Recipe here.

7. Smoky Sloppy Joes with Green Chiles and Greek Yogurt Slaw

Smoky Sloppy Joes with Green Chiles and Greek Yogurt Slaw

Round out the week with good old fashioned comfort. Recipe here.

Bacon and Corn Griddle Cakes

Bacon and Corn Griddle Cakes

Bacon and Corn Griddle Cakes

Hands down my favorite recipe of all time. Seriously. You have got to try this one. It’s like brinner to the extreme!

Homemade griddle cakes loaded with crisp bacon and corn, spiced with a little cayenne to heat things up. If you dare put top these with warm maple syrup and taste a little bacon bliss. If you love bacon, you will love this recipe!

So just make these griddle cakes guys! You will love them.

serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp hot smoked paprika
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 cup corn
  • oil for frying
  • 1/2 cup bacon chopped

Directions:

In a large bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, salt, paprika and sugar. Crack in the eggs and beat them into the flour. Add the milk bit by bit and stir well to combine. You should end up with a very thick pancake batter. Stir through the corn kernels.

Heat a frying pan over medium heat and add 2 tablespoons of oil, twirling the pan to coat the surface evenly. Fry the batter as you would pancakes, using 1 tablespoonful of batter per fritter. This will take about 1-2 minutes a side, until they are golden brown.

Serve with  Roast Tomato, Spinach And Bacon

 

Crock Pot Recipes – Balsamic Chicken Thighs

Crock-Pot-Balsamic-Chicken-Thighs-590x400

Simple enough for any weeknight meal. Delicious enough for company. With a few ingredients and 4 hours in your crock pot you have have the most tender, mouthwatering chicken the whole family will love!

Pair it with any side dishes you like. It makes a nice light sauce so some healthy brown rice pasta would work well.
Or if you are avoiding potatoes at the moment add some nice veggies or salads.
Using boneless chicken thighs is best for perfect tender and juicy chicken, but of course you could always use chicken breast if you’re not a fan of dark meat. My family loved this chicken and each child asked for seconds of it which rarely ever happens! Don’t be worried about the balsamic flavor, it is subtle and not strong at all. The kids will only notice how moist and tasty the chicken is, I promise!

Crock Pot Balsamic Chicken Thighs
Crock Pot Recipe Balsamic Chicken Thighs

Cook time 4 hours
Prep time 5 mins

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 teaspoons dried minced onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 24 ounces) sprinkle of fresh chopped parsley

Instructions

  1. Combine the first five dry spices in a small bowl and spread over chicken on both sides.
  2. Set aside.
  3. Pour olive oil and garlic on the bottom of the crock pot.
  4. Place chicken on top.
  5. Pour balsamic vinegar over the chicken.
  6. Cover and cook on high for 4 hours.
  7. Sprinkle with fresh parsley on top to serve.

Balsamic Chicken Thighs recipe

Unhealthy, Cancer Causing Foods – Never Eat These AGAIN!

Top 10 Most Unhealthy, Cancer Causing Foods – Never Eat These AGAIN!

Top 10 most unhealthy cancer causing foods – never eat these again Top 10 Most Unhealthy, Cancer Causing Foods – Never Eat These AGAIN!

The statement “everything causes cancer” has become a popular hyperbole, and one that some people use as rhetorical fodder to excuse their own dietary and lifestyle failures, particularly as they pertain to cancer risk. But the truth of the matter is that many common food items have, indeed, been scientifically shown to increase cancer risk, and some of them substantially. Here are 10 of the most unhealthy, cancer-causing foods that you should never eat again:

1) Genetically-modified organisms (GMOs). It goes without saying that GMOs have no legitimate place in any cancer-free diet, especially now that both GMOs and the chemicals used to grow them have been shown to cause rapid tumor growth. But GMOs are everywhere, including in most food derivatives made from conventional corn, soybeans, and canola. However, you can avoid them by sticking with certified organic, certified non-GMO verified, and locally-grown foods that are produced naturally without biotechnology.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE: NON-GMO food & NON-GMO Garden Seeds

2) Processed meats. Most processed meat products, including lunch meats, bacon, sausage, and hot dogs, contain chemical preservatives that make them appear fresh and appealing, but that can also cause cancer. Both sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate have been linked to significantly increasing the risk of colon and other forms of cancer, so be sure to choose only uncured meat products made without nitrates, and preferably from grass-fed sources.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE: Beef Jerky

3) Microwave popcorn. They might be convenient, but those bags of microwave popcorn are lined with chemicals that are linked to causing not only infertility but also liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in microwave popcorn bag linings as “likely” carcinogenic, and several independent studies have linked the chemical to causing tumors. Similarly, the diacetyl chemical used in the popcorn itself is linked to causing both lung damage and cancer.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE:  PopCorn

4) Soda pop. Like processed meats, soda pop has been shown to cause cancer as well. Loaded with sugar, food chemicals, and colorings, soda pop acidifies the body and literally feeds cancer cells. Common soda pop chemicals like caramel color and its derivative 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) have also specifically been linked to causing cancer.

5) ‘Diet’ foods, beverages. Even worse than conventional sugar-sweetened soda pop, though, is “diet” soda pop and various other diet beverages and foods. A recent scientific review issued by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) of more than 20 separate research studies found that aspartame, one of the most common artificial sweeteners, causes a range of illnesses including birth defects and cancer. Sucralose (Splenda), saccharin and various other artificial sweeteners have also been linked to causing cancer.

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE:  Healthy Weight Loss Supplements

6) Refined ‘white’ flours. Refined flour is a common ingredient in processed foods, but its excess carbohydrate content is a serious cause for concern. A study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Mile Markers, and Prevention found that regular consumption of refined carbohydrates was linked to a 220 percent increase in breast cancer among women. High-glycemic foods in general have also been shown to rapidly raise blood sugar levels in the body, which directly feeds cancer cell growth and spread.

7) Refined sugars. The same goes for refined sugars, which tend to rapidly spike insulin levels and feed the growth of cancer cells. Fructose-rich sweeteners like high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) are particularly offensive, as cancer cells have been shown to quickly and easily metabolize them in order to proliferate. And since cookies, cakes, pies, sodas, juices, sauces, cereals, and many other popular, mostly processed, food items are loaded with HFCS and other refined sugars, this helps explain why cancer rates are on the rise these days.

8) Conventional apples, grapes, and other ‘dirty’ fruits. Many people think they are eating healthy when they buy apples, grapes, or strawberries from the store. But unless these fruits are organic or verified to be pesticide-free, they could be a major cancer risk. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that up to 98 percent of all conventional produce, and particularly the type found on its “dirty” fruits list, is contaminated with cancer-causing pesticides.

9) Farmed salmon. Farmed salmon is another high-risk cancer food, according to Dr. David Carpenter, Director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University of Albany. According to his assessment, farmed salmon not only lacks vitamin D, but it is often contaminated with carcinogenic chemicals, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), flame retardants, pesticides, and antibiotics.

10) Hydrogenated oils. They are commonly used to preserve processed foods and keep them shelf-stable. But hydrogenated oils alter the structure and flexibility of cell membranes throughout the body, which can lead to a host of debilitating diseases such as cancer. Some manufacturers are phasing out the use of hydrogenated oils and replacing them with palm oil and other safer alternatives, but trans fats are still widely used in processed foods.

Slow Cooker Chicken Cacciatore(Crock Pot)

A quick and easy way to make an old favourite. Slow cooker Chicken Cacciatore. Crock pot Chicken Cacciatore.

3 lbs chicken, cut into pieces
28 oz can San Marzano crushed tomatoes, with juice
1 small sweet onion, diced, about 1 cup
1 red and 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and sliced
2 cups fresh mushrooms, your favorite
1/2 cup red wine, optional
minced garlic, to taste
1 Tbsp Italian seasoning, see recipe below
Salt, to taste
Fresh ground pepper, to taste
Red pepper flakes, to taste
Parmesan cheese


Turn on slow cooker or crock pot to low, add chicken. Cover with tomatoes, onion, sweet peppers, mushrooms, wine, garlic, herbs, spices and pepper flakes. Cook all day long, 6 to 8 hours.

Serve over your favorite cooked pasta or rice. Top with Parmesan Cheese. Enjoy!

Variation: cut chicken into bite size pieces

Southern Fried Chicken

southern_fried_chicken

One of my favourites. Simple recipe for a great southern fried chidken. LOVE IT!

chicken, legs, thighs, breasts
1 cup milk
2 eggs
2 cups flour
1 ½ tsp baking powder
Salt
Pepper
Poultry seasoning…
2 Tbsp Shortening
2 Tbsp butter

Preheat cast iron skillet or fry pan to 350 degrees F (medium) and melt shortening and butter to coat bottom of pan well.

Mix together milk and eggs in a bowl. Place flour and baking powder in a pie place, toss to mix well.

Dip chicken in milk mixture then coat chicken with flour mixture; put in hot fat. Cover and cook for about 8 minutes. Sprinkle salt, pepper, and poultry seasons over chicken….turn chicken, cook 10 minutes. Turn heat down to 300 degrees F (medium low). Turn chicken and cook for 10 minutes on each side or until crispy and golden brown. Remove to plate with paper towel to rest. Serve.

Variation:
Coat chicken in fine bread crumbs in place of flour and baking powder mixture.
Add more spices if desired.